Centrifugal Force

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“Class, at the end of today’s lesson, you will comprehend the power of the scientific concept of centrifugal force.

Raise your hand if you have seen someone use a salad spinner in the kitchen.  Think about what you have seen.  Turn to your neighbor and tell him or her what you have observed about the purpose of the salad spinner and how it works.”

I had my very own private science lesson today.  Science is messy, and it was not a pretty sight.  Here is how it went down:  I was making a casserole to serve at Canasta Night, hosted by me tomorrow at my tiny house.  (Just as a digression, I don’t have the modern version of a “tiny house” which is one of 400 square feet or less.  My house is a whopping 900+ square feet.  Also, I will include the recipe for the casserole at the end, because, hey, someone might want to try it out without the science lesson.)

One of the ingredients is one head of green cabbage, thinly sliced and rinsed.  I thinks to myself, “Self, this would be a good time to use that deluxe salad spinner you bought from your sister, Mary, at last summer’s garage sale!”  So I loaded up the salad spinner, which is very deluxe, and proceeded to spin like crazy.  Now, the lid didn’t really fit down on the spinner because a head of green cabbage, thinly sliced is a honkin’ big bunch of cabbage pieces, I want to tell you.

The ill-fitting lid and the power of the centrifugal force sent that lid across my kitchen like a frisbee, and the cabbage flew!  Hoo-boy.  I had cabbage in my hair!  I was standing in cabbage.  I had cabbage on every single one of the jars on the counter, not to mention the wall, the front of the cupboards, and inside a cupboard that I had failed to close when I pulled out said salad spinner to spin the heck out of those thinly sliced and tightly packed bits of the green stuff.  I lost about a third of that cabbage, but not to worry.  There was plenty left to finish up the casserole.
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Just saying’, there’s a power there in a salad spinner, useful, and sometimes not so much.  At the end of the food prep, believe me, I thoroughly comprehended the power of the scientific concept of centrifugal force, because I had applied that concept to the fullest.  And if you can’t laugh at yourself, who can you laugh at?

Recipe:  Southern Sausage and Cabbage Casserole

1 pound ground beef                              1 pound smoked sausage

2 onions, chopped                                  1-2 cloves garlic, minced

1 t chili powder                                        1 c. uncooked rice

1/2 stick butter                                        1 can stewed tomatoes

1 head cabbage, thinly sliced and rinsed.

Oven 350 degrees.  Brown beef and sausage.  Drain, add butter, onions, garlic, chili powder.  Simmer until the onions are clear; add tomatoes and remove from heat.  Combine meat mixture with rice and cabbage.  Cover and bake for 1-1.5 hours, stirring every 30 minutes.  Serve hot.  Makes a whole heck of a lot, maybe even two casseroles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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One response »

  1. Hahah a ha!!! I have a photo of myself covered in some dough goop when I opened the food processor before it stopped 🙂

    On Nov 21, 2016 12:41 PM, “Horton Hears Herself” wrote:

    > Horton Hears Herself posted: “”Class, at the end of today’s lesson, you > will comprehend the power of the scientific concept of centrifugal force. > Raise your hand if you have seen someone use a salad spinner in the > kitchen. Think about what you have seen. Turn to your neighbor and t” >

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